The Blimp That Split Ended Up In Two The high-tech military surveillance blimp that broke loose over Maryland and Pennsylvania this week was brought down by a low-tech solution: It was shot and deflated.

The Blimp That Split Ended Up In Two

The Blimp That Split Ended Up In Two

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The high-tech military surveillance blimp that broke loose over Maryland and Pennsylvania this week was brought down by a low-tech solution: It was shot and deflated.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with an update on a military surveillance blimp that broke loose over Maryland and Pennsylvania this week, ripping power lines and generally causing chaos. The blimp is part of the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Defense Elevated Netted Sensor System. Wow. You can just call that JLENS. It's a high-tech program, but AP is reporting state troopers had a low-tech solution to get the blimp out of the trees. They shot it and deflated it. A U.S. Army captain says, the blimp is in two, quote, "mostly intact pieces." It's MORNING EDITION.

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