With Sombreros And Sidesaddles, Virginia Women Renew A Mexican Tradition The star of the Mexican rodeo may be the cowboy, but it's the cowgirls who put on the best show. Women of the El Dorado ranch are rediscovering this tradition in an unlikely place: rural Virginia.
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With Sombreros And Sidesaddles, Virginia Women Renew A Mexican Tradition

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With Sombreros And Sidesaddles, Virginia Women Renew A Mexican Tradition

With Sombreros And Sidesaddles, Virginia Women Renew A Mexican Tradition

With Sombreros And Sidesaddles, Virginia Women Renew A Mexican Tradition

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455243894/455243897" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Before their performance, three members of the Amazonas del Dorado watch the men's roping and riding competitions. Vanessa Rancaño/NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Rancaño/NPR

Before their performance, three members of the Amazonas del Dorado watch the men's roping and riding competitions.

Vanessa Rancaño/NPR

They sit high on their imported sidesaddles, their ruffled skirts tucked neatly beneath them at a ranch in northern Virginia. Las Amazonas del Dorado — this riding group slated to perform — are preparing for their next ride.

These six women are engaging in the sport of escaramuza, a group riding event performed only by women at Mexican rodeos.

"When you're on the horse and performing, it gives me chills every time," said 17-year-old Adriana Jimenez. "Inside, you feel this great happiness, and it fills me up with pride inside to be from a place so full of culture and life and color."

While the star of the show is the cowboy, these cowgirls provide some of the sport's most dazzling entertainment.

To hear more about these women and the sport, listen to the audio link above.

The Amazonas perform in the rodeo ring their family built in Catlett, Va. Vanessa Rancaño/NPR hide caption

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Vanessa Rancaño/NPR

The Amazonas perform in the rodeo ring their family built in Catlett, Va.

Vanessa Rancaño/NPR