GOP Debate Wi-Fi Password: 'StopHillary' Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus told Politico that the "StopHillary" password was to emphasize to reporters that there are in fact two political parties.

GOP Debate Wi-Fi Password: 'StopHillary'

GOP Debate Wi-Fi Password: 'StopHillary'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/455577704/455577705" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus told Politico that the "StopHillary" password was to emphasize to reporters that there are in fact two political parties.

A card on a desk at the GOP presidential debate in Milwaukee, Wis., Tuesday, noting the password to access Internet in the media filing center — "StopHillary." Don Gonyea/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Don Gonyea/NPR

A card on a desk at the GOP presidential debate in Milwaukee, Wis., Tuesday, noting the password to access Internet in the media filing center — "StopHillary."

Don Gonyea/NPR

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer. Last night at the Republican debate, candidates went after each other on policy issues. But those in attendance were given a reminder of who the real opponent is because the Wi-Fi password at the event was, StopHillary. RNC chairman Reince Priebus told Politico the password was to emphasize to reporters that there are, in fact, two political parties. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.