Correction: World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle On Wednesday's program, NPR misidentified the gigantic jigsaw puzzle. We incorrectly stated it was a work called "Wildnerness" by Adrian Chesterton, when in fact it is called "Wildlife" by Adrian Chesterman.
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Correction: World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle

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Correction: World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle

Correction: World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle

Correction: World's Largest Jigsaw Puzzle

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/456683681/456683682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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On Wednesday's program, NPR misidentified the gigantic jigsaw puzzle. We incorrectly stated it was a work called "Wildnerness" by Adrian Chesterton, when in fact it is called "Wildlife" by Adrian Chesterman.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And now this note of correction from yesterday's program. Our item about the gigantic jigsaw puzzle - the one with nearly 34,000 pieces, the one that is 18 feet long and 5 feet wide when assembled - well, contained some misidentifications. Turns out, the image featured on the puzzle is not a work called "Wilderness" by the artist Adrian Chesterton (ph). It is "Wildlife" by Adrian Chesterman. You can see a picture of "Wildlife" as whole, not in 33,600 pieces, on our Facebook page, NPR ATC. You can also find the show on Twitter at @npratc. I'm on Facebook and Twitter at @arishapiro.

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