Stanford Researchers Find A Flaw In Self-Driving Cars If the auto-pilot on a car fails, the person at the wheel is supposed to be alert and seize control. But when testing the technology in driving simulators, drivers tended to fall asleep.

Stanford Researchers Find A Flaw In Self-Driving Cars

Stanford Researchers Find A Flaw In Self-Driving Cars

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If the auto-pilot on a car fails, the person at the wheel is supposed to be alert and seize control. But when testing the technology in driving simulators, drivers tended to fall asleep.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Researchers found a flaw in self-driving cars. Stanford University discovered this safety concern. If the autopilot on a car goes wrong, the person at the wheel is supposed to be alert and seize control. But when testing the technology in driving simulators, drivers tend to fall asleep. Researchers suggest drivers should read or watch a movie, which will distract them from the road but at least will also distract them from napping. It's MORNING EDITION.

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