Muslim Americans React To Donald Trump's Controversial Statements Muslim Americans say they're upset over Donald Trump's call to keep Muslims from entering the country.

Muslim Americans React To Donald Trump's Controversial Statements

Muslim Americans React To Donald Trump's Controversial Statements

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Muslim Americans say they're upset over Donald Trump's call to keep Muslims from entering the country.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The backlash was swift against Donald Trump for his call for a quote, "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States." In a moment, we will hear reaction from members of the Republican Party. But first, what does it feel like to be the target of this rhetoric today? Layla Alaoui is a mother in Boston. She says she struggled to talk with her second-grade son about it.

LAYLA ALAOUI: He goes, well, in my school, my friend's talking that this guy wants to kill all Muslims. Really, that thing just shocked me. I mean, I had no answer. The only thing I can think that minute - I wish I was prepared for the question. I was not.

CORNISH: Lewiston is a town in Maine with many Somali refugees. Abdikadir Mohammed is a baker there.

ABDIKADIR MOHAMMED: To me, it's, like, a hate thing. He's saying, that because I hate Muslims, they should not be welcomed. I think it's wrong.

CORNISH: And Mahmud Muktar is another Somali immigrant in Lewiston.

MAHMUD MUKTAR: So we needed peace so we came here for peace. We didn't come here for fighting or terrorists or all that.

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