Panel Round One Our panelists answer questions about the week's news....Pause For Your Paws; The Hyperbolic Oath
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Panel Round One

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Panel Round One

Panel Round One

Panel Round One

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news....Pause For Your Paws; The Hyperbolic Oath

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Panel, it is time for you again to answer some questions about this week's news. Adam, Netflix unveiled some groundbreaking technology this week. If you want to enjoy streaming shows in the most effective way possible, you'll need to get Netflix's new what?

ADAM BURKE: Can I have that again?

SAGAL: Well, these are expensive, they're technologically sophisticated, so you do not want to lose one of these in the wash.

BURKE: A sock?

SAGAL: Yes, Netflix socks.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: These are socks to wear while you are binge watching. Why? Because these socks use an accelerometer inside them to detect if you have fallen asleep.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: And if you have, they send a signal to pause whatever you were watching 'til you wake up again.

(LAUGHTER)

TOM BODETT: That is so humanitarian...

SAGAL: Isn't that amazing?

BODETT: ...Because they could administer a little shock that woke you up again.

SAGAL: They could.

BILL KURTIS: (Unintelligible).

ROXANNE ROBERTS: What if only your foot is asleep?

SAGAL: Well, actually...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: This is amazing. The first thing it does is - because I said, you know, I'm basically as still as the grave when I'm watching TV. And apparently, what it does is if it hasn't noticed any movement - and it can sense very small movements - but if it hasn't noticed any, it starts flashing a little light, in which case if you're awake, you just wiggle your foot and it goes back to sleep. It doesn't - then it turns off the stream so you don't wake up to find out you watched the entire season four of whatever. So move over ice cream-stained sweatpants. There's a new saddest garment in town.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Tom, this week, Donald Trump's doctor finally released Mr. Trump's medical report. How healthy is Donald Trump?

BODETT: He is the healthiest guy alive, I think. The weasel on his head is not doing so good.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You're - I'll give it to you. He is the healthiest man alive, very good.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: In what is great news for Donald Trump and bad news for every other human being, Donald Trump's health is, quote, "astonishingly excellent." His doctor says - and you must see this note if you haven't - if elected, Trump would be the, quote, healthiest president in history.

BURKE: How were they making this comparison? Yes, he's currently healthier than Lincoln.

SAGAL: That's true.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: You may ask how may this 69-year-old somewhat louche guy be that incredibly healthy? Well, we interviewed cancer, and cancer was, like, are you kidding? I am not going near that guy.

(LAUGHTER)

BODETT: Replicate those cells?

SAGAL: No.

BODETT: I don't think so.

SAGAL: There's enough of them are ready.

ROBERTS: No chance for heart disease.

SAGAL: None whatsoever.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FEELING GOOD")

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing) And that's what I feel. And it's a new dawn and a new day and a life for me. And I'm feeling good.

SAGAL: Coming up, Christmas gets a much-needed updated in our Bluff The Listener Game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT… DON’T TELL ME from NPR.

KURTIS: Support for NPR comes from NPR stations and LifeLock, reminding consumers that while shopping online or in stores this holiday season, a trail of personal information is left behind, increasing risk of identity theft - more at lifelock.com. Progressive Insurance, working to make progress for more than 75 years. And the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, working to find cures for leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease and myeloma, improve the quality of life for patients and their families and ensure access to treatments for patients - lls.org.

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