Gamer Improves On Super Mario Bros. Record A gamer named Darbian held the record for Super Mario Bros. He kept at it, knowing he could go faster. And, he broke his own record — cutting milliseconds to get a near perfect run.
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Gamer Improves On Super Mario Bros. Record

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Gamer Improves On Super Mario Bros. Record

Gamer Improves On Super Mario Bros. Record

Gamer Improves On Super Mario Bros. Record

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A gamer named Darbian held the record for Super Mario Bros. He kept at it, knowing he could go faster. And, he broke his own record — cutting milliseconds to get a near perfect run.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. You know, it seems like there's a world record for everything, like beating the original "Super Mario Bros." A gamer named Darbian had the record but knew he could go faster. He filmed himself dodging koopas and goombas. You can see his heart rate on the screen. The final moment...

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

DARBIAN: Oh, my gosh.

GREENE: As anticlimactic as the famously uninspiring message you get when you win - we present you a new quest, press button B to select a world. It's MORNING EDITION.

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