Scientists Experiment With 'Headprints' German scientists are researching how an ultrasound technique would bounce off a person's head — noting the special way a skull vibrates in response. It would be as unique as a fingerprint.

Scientists Experiment With 'Headprints'

Scientists Experiment With 'Headprints'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/475696014/475696015" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

German scientists are researching how an ultrasound technique would bounce off a person's head — noting the special way a skull vibrates in response. It would be as unique as a fingerprint.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep. In the movie "Airplane II," doors open automatically with a woosh (ph), and the password is for a person to make that wooshing sound.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "AIRPLANE II")

INSKEEP: German scientists now want you to open doors with a sound, and you don't have to even make it. An ultrasound signal would bounce off your head. It would note the special way that your skull vibrates in response.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, HOST:

What if you have a head cold?

INSKEEP: Well, then you go back to saying woosh-woosh. You're listening to MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.