Voters Head To The Polls In Critical Indiana Primary Indiana voters head to the polls Tuesday to vote in the state primaries.
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Voters Head To The Polls In Critical Indiana Primary

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Voters Head To The Polls In Critical Indiana Primary

Voters Head To The Polls In Critical Indiana Primary

Voters Head To The Polls In Critical Indiana Primary

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476639173/476639174" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Indiana voters head to the polls Tuesday to vote in the state primaries.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Today is Indiana's turn to vote for Republican and Democrat presidential candidates. The state is diverse. There's a big city, big farms and a fading manufacturing industry. On the Republican side, Donald Trump is divisive, but he's expected to win because of voters like 67-year-old Robert Wurthrich.

ROBERT WURTHRICH: He was not my first choice, Trump. I voted for him because I think he's the only one that can win.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

But as we'll hear later in the program, Trump's main rival, Ted Cruz, has campaigned hard in Indiana. He has the backing of, among others, Jennie Ramey of Lafayette.

JENNIE RAMEY: We like him because of the Second Amendment. We like him because of freedom of religion that he stands for and that he's always been for the Constitution and fought for it to preserve the rights.

CORNISH: On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton is leading Bernie Sanders in the polls, though not by much. Whitney Babbit says she likes both candidates but went with Clinton.

WHITNEY BABBIT: I think Hillary is a pragmatist. I think that she's actually, you know, the more moderate candidate. I really like that Bernie has pulled her left a little bit. But for me, she was the best choice, the best candidate.

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