10-Year-Old Boy From Finland Hacks Instagram; Gets Rewarded Facebook, which owns Instagram, pays people who find bugs on its services. When a young hacker found a way to delete other people's comments, he emailed Facebook, and then received $10,000.
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10-Year-Old Boy From Finland Hacks Instagram; Gets Rewarded

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10-Year-Old Boy From Finland Hacks Instagram; Gets Rewarded

10-Year-Old Boy From Finland Hacks Instagram; Gets Rewarded

10-Year-Old Boy From Finland Hacks Instagram; Gets Rewarded

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476705839/476705840" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facebook, which owns Instagram, pays people who find bugs on its services. When a young hacker found a way to delete other people's comments, he emailed Facebook, and then received $10,000.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. As a kid, you probably came up with all kinds of ways to make a few bucks - mow a lawn, sell some lemonade or, you know, hack into Instagram. One boy in Finland went with that last option.

Facebook, which owns Instagram, pays people who find bugs on its services. So when a young hacker, just 10 years old, found a way to delete other people's comments, he emailed Facebook and bam, $10,000 in his pocket. How will he use his riches? He's going to buy a new bike and a football. It's MORNING EDITION.

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