Trump's Golf Course, Trump's Rules? Former boxing champ Oscar De La Hoya says he saw Donald Trump cheat twice while they played golf together two years ago. They were playing at the Trump National Golf Club in Los Angles.
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Trump's Golf Course, Trump's Rules?

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Trump's Golf Course, Trump's Rules?

Trump's Golf Course, Trump's Rules?

Trump's Golf Course, Trump's Rules?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476844381/476844382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former boxing champ Oscar De La Hoya says he saw Donald Trump cheat twice while they played golf together two years ago. They were playing at the Trump National Golf Club in Los Angles.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a new story that imitates art. In "Caddyshack," a golfer kicks his ball from the rough into the fairway.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "CADDYSHACK")

TED KNIGHT: (As Judge Elihu Smails) Don't count that. That was interfered with.

MICHAEL O'KEEFE: (As Danny Noonan) Yes, sir.

INSKEEP: A similar stories is being told about Donald Trump. Boxing promoter Oscar De La Hoya made news by invoking Trump's name. He says he once saw Trump cheating when they played golf, also putting a ball on the fairway. De La Hoya says it was a test of character, but adds it was Trump's golf course and so it was Trump's rules. It's MORNING EDITION.

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