Astronomy Studying Quebec Teen Discovers Lost Mayan City William Gadoury noticed a three-star constellation with only two Mayan cities and theorized there must be another one. Satellite images confirm buried geometric shapes in an area of dense vegetation.

Astronomy Studying Quebec Teen Discovers Lost Mayan City

Astronomy Studying Quebec Teen Discovers Lost Mayan City

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William Gadoury noticed a three-star constellation with only two Mayan cities and theorized there must be another one. Satellite images confirm buried geometric shapes in an area of dense vegetation.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. A 15-year-old may have discovered a Mayan city from his bedroom in Quebec. Obsessed with Mayan culture, William Gadoury discovered a correlation between Mayan star charts and its cities. He then noticed a three-star constellation with only two cities and theorized there must be another one. Satellite images confirm buried geometric shapes after he showed his maps to archaeologists, who promised Gadoury a seat on the expedition. It's MORNING EDITION.

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