Meet The 86-Year-Old Ice Cream Man Who Says He's Sold A Million Cones Sandor Foldi is Britain's longest-serving ice cream seller, according to the Daily Mirror. He says he's been selling summer's favorite treat for 54 years, and, "I'll keep on till I'm 99."

Meet The 86-Year-Old Ice Cream Man Who Says He's Sold A Million Cones

Meet The 86-Year-Old Ice Cream Man Who Says He's Sold A Million Cones

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Sandor Foldi is Britain's longest-serving ice cream seller, according to the Daily Mirror. He says he's been selling summer's favorite treat for 54 years, and, "I'll keep on till I'm 99."

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, let's begin this story with a sound you may well hear on this holiday.

(SOUNDBITE OF ICE CREAM TRUCK MUSIC)

INSKEEP: The sound of an ice cream truck. And in all the years that I ran after those trucks as a kid, I never thought much about the person inside. Maybe I should have because it's a job, which a British man has done for most of his life.

SANDOR FOLDI: I think I sold the most ice cream in the world.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

Sandor Foldi says he's sold more than 1.3 million cones.

INSKEEP: Now, it's hard to confirm that that's the most in the world. But we can confirm he's been selling ice cream for 54 years.

CHANG: Before working in ice cream, Foldi worked as a police officer and in a circus and as an electrician - you know, the usual career path.

FOLDI: I was doing the electric welding. And my doctor said it's no good for you because of the fumes and everything. So he said - would you do something else? So I said oh, well, I took on ice cream.

INSKEEP: Why not? And today, according to the Daily Mirror, Mr. Foldi turns 86. He plans to keep selling ice cream until age 99.

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