Generation Politics: 65-Year-Olds Share Experiences That Shaped Their Views NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to a group of 65-year-old voters who were born into a structured world, which, for many, resembled The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.

Generation Politics: 65-Year-Olds Share Experiences That Shaped Their Views

Generation Politics: 65-Year-Olds Share Experiences That Shaped Their Views

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NPR's Robert Siegel speaks to a group of 65-year-old voters as part of a radio series where he explores the generational differences between how 25, 45 and 65-year-olds think about politics. He finds that this group of 65-year-olds were born into a structured world, which, for many, resembled The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. But later, their outlook was rocked by a series of assassinations of political figures, anti-war and civil rights protests.