Families Remember Victims Of Orlando Nightclub Massacre NPR talks with the families of the victims in Sunday's mass shooting in Orlando, Fla.

Families Remember Victims Of Orlando Nightclub Massacre

Families Remember Victims Of Orlando Nightclub Massacre

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NPR talks with the families of the victims in Sunday's mass shooting in Orlando, Fla.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Throughout the day we've been hearing more about the 49 people who were murdered yesterday. Twenty-year-old Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo was born and raised in Puerto Rico. He and his family moved to Cleveland when he was a kid. In 2013, Ocasio-Capo moved to Orlando. And he planned to enroll at nearby Valencia College for theater.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

His older sister, Belinette Ocasio-Capo, says his true love was dance.

BELINETTE OCASIO-CAPO: He danced his little self off (laughter). He loved dancing hip-hop, salsa, merengue, Oaxaca - anything you could put on the radio, he would dance.

MCEVERS: And that was how Omar spent his final hours. One of the last images of him was posted by a friend on Snapchat. It was a video of Omar dancing with friends at Pulse nightclub just a couple of hours before the shooting began.

CORNISH: His sister, Belinette, says that's exactly how he would've wanted to be remembered.

OCASIO-CAPO: He always told me Belli, if something ever happens to me, just make sure you don't cry, please. I just want you guys to have fun. I know it's going to hurt, but I just want you guys to literally just have fun and just know that I'm with you guys no matter what. And I just took it as OK, I got you. And he always told me if something happens, remember my favorite color is yellow (laughter).

CORNISH: She says while her family is heartbroken, they've been bolstered by the outpouring of support from those who loved him.

OCASIO-CAPO: I have people from Mexico, from Vegas, from California, Colombia, Salvador - I have so many people writing me on Facebook. I know my brother was loved. And that is one thing that I'm OK with because I know that he made a difference in other people's lives.

MCEVERS: That was Belinette Ocasio-Capo talking about her brother. Luis Omar Ocasio-Capo was 20, one of the youngest people killed at Pulse nightclub.

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