At Least 32 Killed, More Than 80 Wounded In Istanbul Airport Attack An attack at Istanbul International Airport has killed at least 32 people and wounded many more. A Turkish official says there could have been as many as three explosions.

At Least 32 Killed, More Than 80 Wounded In Istanbul Airport Attack

At Least 32 Killed, More Than 80 Wounded In Istanbul Airport Attack

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An attack at Istanbul International Airport has killed at least 32 people and wounded many more. A Turkish official says there could have been as many as three explosions.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And here's what we know about the attack on Istanbul's Ataturk Airport. At least 36 people have been killed, and at least 100 more have been wounded. Of course as more facts become known, those numbers could change.

As to what happened, Turkey's prime minister said that three suicide bombers opened before detonating their explosives. He also said that based on what is now known, officials there suspect the attack was committed by the Islamic State or ISIS. No group has claimed responsibility.

There have been several terror attacks this year throughout Turkey, and the government has blamed some on ISIS, others on Kurdish militants. The airport is the third-largest in Europe. Hundreds of passengers and airport workers have been evacuated. Flights in and out were suspended, but according to the prime minister, some flights have resumed. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan issued a statement saying that Turkey will fight against terrorism until the end.

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