Robot Helps 160,000 Motorists Beat Parking Tickets Joshua Browder was fed up with parking tickets so he made a robot to help people challenge fines. The robot chats with people in London and New York, asks them what happened and writes an appeal.

Robot Helps 160,000 Motorists Beat Parking Tickets

Robot Helps 160,000 Motorists Beat Parking Tickets

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Joshua Browder was fed up with parking tickets so he made a robot to help people challenge fines. The robot chats with people in London and New York, asks them what happened and writes an appeal.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with bad news for some lawyers. The robots are here, and they're coming for your jobs. Joshua Browder was fed up with parking tickets. So the teenager made Do Not Pay, a bot to help people challenge their fines.

The robot chats with people in London and New York, asks them what happened and then writes an appeal. So far, Browder says it's helped 160,000 people beat their tickets. The whole thing takes less than a minute, and it's absolutely free - another blow to the lawyers out there. It's MORNING EDITION.

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