NPR Politics Lunchbox: DIY Election Forecast, Frustrations With Clinton Emails Our favorite 2016 news and stories curated from NPR and around the web. Today: take a drive in our new demographic tool and Elizabeth Warren's (maybe) foray into teaching wizardry.
NPR logo NPR Politics Lunchbox: DIY Election Forecast, Frustrations With Clinton Emails

NPR Politics Lunchbox: DIY Election Forecast, Frustrations With Clinton Emails

David Goldman/AP
Primary voters may be having an impact on the economy even before a new president is chosen. Some analysts say a slowdown in hiring may be linked to uncertainty about the elections.
David Goldman/AP

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 17 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 24 days in Philadelphia.

Did you know? Attending conventions is far from cheap, and for some delegates the surge in prices has forced them to turn to crowdfunding sites to help pay their way down to Philadelphia. Talking to DNC delegates, Vice News estimated the per-person cost between $3,000 to $8,000.


June 30, 2016

This morning we talked about an unscheduled meeting between U.S. Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch and former President Bill Clinton amid the Justice Department and FBI's investigation into Hillary Clinton's emails, how conservative Christians are grappling with whether 'religious freedom' includes Muslims, and President Obama's meeting with the leaders of Mexico and Canada.


Our Top Five

Our favorite 2016 stories this morning from NPR and around the web.

  • 1. Now Everyone Can Be A Political Pundit!

    Juan Elosua and Brittany Mayes
    Juan Elosua and Brittany Mayes/NPR
    Juan Elosua and Brittany Mayes

    NPR reports: Donald Trump loves winning. "We will have so much winning," he has said in this campaign, "if I get elected, that you may get bored with winning." But who will actually win come November? NPR Politics created a data-driven way to tackle that question: The 270 Project. It's a nifty tool that allows you to adjust voter turnout among five demographics. Check it out for yourself!

  • 2. Not Again: Frustrations With Clintonmail.com

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
    Federal investigators have interviewed Huma Abedin and other top Hillary Clinton aides as part of an ongoing investigation into the candidate's use of a private email server as secretary of state
    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    The New York Times reports: According to a deposition transcript released Wednesday, Hillary Clinton's private email server use created frustrations at the State Department because of several technical glitches. The deposition was of Huma Abedin, Clinton's close aide — part of the pretrial legal proceedings for a lawsuit brought by the conservative organization Judicial Watch.

  • 3. Mike Lee is MAD

    Justin Hayworth/AP
    Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, speaks during the Iowa Faith and Freedom Coalition's Friends of the Family Banquet in Des Moines, Iowa, in November 2013. Lee is one of the few candidates calling for 17th Amendment repeal who have won office.
    Justin Hayworth/AP

    Politico reports: In a tense interview, prominent conservative Utah Sen. Mike Lee attacked Trump after being pressed on Lee's refusal to endorse the Republican presumptive nominee. "We can get into the fact that he accused my best friend's father of conspiring to kill JFK," he told NewsMax, also listing off Trump's "religiously intolerant" and "wildly unpopular" statements as reasons voters are "nervous." He said that Trump could win Lee's support only if he "heard the right things."

  • 4. Swing State Lawsuit Over Voting Laws

    Stephanie Keith/Getty Images
    People line up to check in to their voting station at Public School 22 in Brooklyn on Tuesday.
    Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

    Member Station Wisconsin Public Radio reports: Attorneys in a lawsuit seeking to overturn a variety of voting laws in Wisconsin will make their closing arguments today. Liberal organization One Wisconsin Institute claims restrictions on in-person absentee voting and the elimination of straight-ticket voting (and others) place a burden on minority, young and Democratic voters. Attorneys for the Wisconsin Department of Justice say the plaintiffs don't have a case because they lack proof of disenfranchisement, adding that an "anecdote is not evidence of a system burden on voters." Judge James Peterson said his final decision in the case will leave both sides unhappy.

  • 5. The King Of Debt?

    Ron Jenkins/Getty Images
    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump in Dallas, Texas last week.
    Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

    Bloomberg reports: Municipalities are still waiting for bills to be paid by the Trump campaign after security and property damage costs from his sometimes raucous rallies. For example, a California suburb charged the campaign $15,000 to cover police overtime for security around violent anti-Trump protesters in April. They, and other cities, are similarly still waiting for reimbursement, costs if not fulfilled will fall to taxpayers.

  • BONUS: Warren, Professor Of Wizardry Or Witchcraft?

    Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
    Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at the National Press Club Wednesday. Warren was critical of President Obama's plan to change how U.S. multinational companies are taxed.
    Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

    CNN reports: Sen. Elizabeth Warren says she's available to teach at the American School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. According to Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling, the school is based in Massachusetts, but it's fictional (we're sad about it too). Warren tweeted at Rowling: Looking for a Defense Against the Dark Arts prof, @jk_rowling? Where do I apply? Trump, Death Eaters--I got this!" Rowling is working on a new Harry Potter book. The story will take place at a magical school in the state where Warren serves as senator — Massachusetts.