Sunday Puzzle: With the Fourth of July and cookouts on our mind, here's a game of categories based on the word PATIO. For each category, name an item in the category starting with the letters P, A, T, I and O.
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Just In Time For The 4th, Here's A Puzzle Tailor-Made For The Patio

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Just In Time For The 4th, Here's A Puzzle Tailor-Made For The Patio

Just In Time For The 4th, Here's A Puzzle Tailor-Made For The Patio

Just In Time For The 4th, Here's A Puzzle Tailor-Made For The Patio

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484502061/484563037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

On-air challenge: With the Fourth of July and cookouts on my mind, I brought a game of Categories — based on the word PATIO. I'm going to give you some categories. For each one, name something in the category starting with each of the letters P, A, T, I and O.

For example, if the category were three-syllable boy's names, you might say Patterson, Anthony, Timothy, Isaiah and Oliver. Any answer that works is fine, and you can give the answers in any order.

Last week's challenge, from listener Peter Collins of Ann Arbor, Mich.: Think of two well-known American cities, each five letters long. The first two letters of the first city are the state postal abbreviation of the second city. And the first two letters of the second city are the state postal abbreviation of the first city. What two cities are these?

Answer: Miami, FL, and Flint, MI.

Winner: Amanda Finke of Santa Fe, N.M.

Next week's challenge:

Take the word FALSE. Divide it between the L and the S. The start of the word is the start of FALL, and the end of the word is the end of RISE. And, of course, "fall" and "rise" are opposites. Do the same thing for the word SHALL. Divide it into two parts, so that the start of it starts one word and the end of it ends another word — and those two words are opposites. The dividing point is for you to discover. There are three different solutions. I want you to find all three.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday, July 7, at 3 p.m. ET.