Photos From 'Dallas Morning News' Show Officers In Mourning Dallas Morning News photographer Ting Shen, who's a summer intern, was shooting photos of the scene at Baylor University Medical Center.

Photos From 'Dallas Morning News' Show Officers In Mourning

Photos From 'Dallas Morning News' Show Officers In Mourning

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Dallas Morning News photographer Ting Shen, who's a summer intern, was shooting photos of the scene at Baylor University Medical Center.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

President Obama is reacting to a shooting in Dallas that has left five police officers dead and six officers wounded.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I believe that I speak for every single American when I say that we are horrified over these events and that we stand united with the people and the police department in Dallas.

GREENE: The president speaking there while at the NATO summit in Poland. The attack on police in Dallas took place during what was an otherwise peaceful protest over the deaths of two African-American men in encounters with police this week. The front page of today's Dallas Morning News is emblematic of the heartbreak that city is feeling this morning. There's a photo showing a hulking police officer crying in the arms of a colleague.

TING SHEN: I was by the hospital on the sidewalk, and I stared into the entrance. I heard some sobbing.

GREENE: That is the voice of Ting Shen, the intern who took the photo at Baylor University Medical Center.

SHEN: It's a large black officer in sweat and tears trying to comfort a smaller female officer with tears coming down their eyes while the hospital personnel was rushing by them, working on the situation.

GREENE: Shen described the mood at that hospital as numb.

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