NPR Politics Lunchbox: Continued Protests, GOP Platform Calls For Marriage Amendment Our favorite 2016 news and stories curated from NPR and around the web. Today, protests continue across America's cities and more than 40 million Americans shoulder $1.3 trillion in student debt.

NPR Politics Lunchbox: Continued Protests, GOP Platform Calls For Marriage Amendment

People gather to protest the shooting of Alton Sterling on Sunday in Baton Rouge, La. Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

People gather to protest the shooting of Alton Sterling on Sunday in Baton Rouge, La.

Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 6 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 13 days in Philadelphia.

Did you know? While the Secret Service has forbidden guns inside the RNC, as reported in March, Ohio state law requires Cleveland authorities to allow guns to be carried in the area around the convention center, despite concerns of violence from the expected heavy protests.


July 11, 2016

Today we talked about Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton's announcement to campaign together in New Hampshire on July 12, more details emerge on the Dallas shooter who fatally shot five police officers, contemplating what kind of first lady Melania Trump would be, the changing campaign approach in the swing state of Iowa, and Detroit's working class men who are split on Donald Trump.

Our Top Five

Our favorite 2016 stories this morning from NPR and around the Web.

  • 1. Protests In Baton Rouge Continue

    Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images
    BATON ROUGE, LA -JULY 10: Several arrested protesters get processed on the scene after a march on July 10, 2016 in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
    Mark Wallheiser/Getty Images

    Member station WWNO reports: Following the shooting death of Alton Sterling by a Baton Rouge police officer six days ago, large protests continued to permeate the Louisiana city last night. Local police responded in riot gear, and arrested at least 50 over the course of the night. NPR reports: Baton Rouge's protests were among a wave of demonstrations across the country, in multiple cities, focusing attention on police shootings in Louisiana and Minnesota.

  • 2. We'll Take What We Can Get

    Mark Wilson/Getty Images
    Presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump in Washington, D.C., earlier this week.
    Mark Wilson/Getty Images

    NBC News reports: They may not be able to get rid of Donald Trump, but anti-Trump delegates in Cleveland are trying to at least seize one major concession: control over Trump's vice presidential pick. The effort, led by the group Free the Delegates, is aiming to change the RNC's Rule 40, allowing delegates to potentially override any running mate pick from Trump. This kind of floor fight was threatened in 2008, when many Republican activists found then-Sen. Joe Lieberman's track record on abortion unacceptable. The group has already raised money for ads in Cleveland and has organized a ground operation at the convention.

  • 3. The Clintons' Cash Cow

    Bruce Glikas/Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic
    NEW YORK, NY - JULY 02: (L-R) Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Lin Manuel Miranda chat backstage at the hit musical "Hamilton" on Broadway.
    Bruce Glikas/Bruce Glikas/FilmMagic

    The Los Angeles Times reports: Hillary and Bill Clinton's speaking gigs in California changed the rules for paid speech-making, coercing companies, nonprofits, and universities to pay unprecedented amounts for events over which the Clintons exercised unprecedented control. Event organizers across California trying to land a visit from either Clinton were surprised with costly expenses for private jets and other expensive transportation arrangements, demands for speaking fees that were sometimes double that of other high-profile speakers, and requests to cede meticulous control over questions and guests to the Clintons.

  • 4. Security Credentials For Clinton Aides

    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images
    NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 17: Democratic presidential candidate former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) talks with aide Huma Abedin (R) before speaking at a neighborhood block party in the Brooklyn borough of New York City.
    Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

    The Hill reports: Lawmakers are slamming Hillary Clinton and her aides for their role in the former secretary of state's use of a private email server. They are pressuring the State Department to revoke and reject security credentials for Clinton's closest aides, including Huma Abedin and Jake Sullivan. The revocation of their credentials - and other threatened repercussions - would be career-ending for them. For example, were Clinton to become president, her ability to bring on her closest aides as advisers would be jeopardized.

  • 5. GOP Platform Seeks Historic Changes

    Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.
    The Quicken Loans Arena will host the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.
    Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call,Inc.

    CNN reports: The first draft of the GOP Convention platform affirms Trump's stance on trade. "We need better negotiated trade agreements that put America first," the draft reads, adding that it will counter countries who don't cooperate. It also seeks to reject the Supreme Court's 2015 decision deeming same-sex marriage bans unconstitutional. It replaces past phrasing of marriage between "one man and one woman" with "married mom and dad," and wants states to define marriage for themselves. This comes as gay political power reaches record high — with over 500 LGBT officials serving in elected office at all levels of the government.

  • 5. BONUS: Student Debt (Sucks)

    Chris Nickels for NPR
    An illustration depicting college graduates drowning in a mortarboard cap full of water.
    Chris Nickels for NPR

    NPR reports: More than 40 million Americans owe a combined $1.3 trillion in student debt. How did we get here and who is profiting the most? The privatization of Sallie Mae in 1997 and reduced budgets for education funds (which has increased tuition costs) have shifted the burden of payment to students. From 2012 to 2013, Sallie Mae profited $3.5 billion. Recently, there have been improvements to the system, such as easier payment options and more transparency in loan offerings. But many are still struggling to reduce their debt and to purchase high-ticket items, like a home or car.