NPR Politics Lunchbox: 'Never Trump' Last Stand, New Sanders Book Our favorite 2016 news and stories curated from NPR and 'round the Web. Today, a last ditch effort from the anti-Trump camp and Clinton campaign's use of Pokemon Go.
NPR logo NPR Politics Lunchbox: 'Never Trump' Last Stand, New Sanders Book

NPR Politics Lunchbox: 'Never Trump' Last Stand, New Sanders Book

Gene J. Puskar/AP
Carpenter Bill Kaim of Cleveland, works on the convention floor at the Quicken Loans Arena in downtown Cleveland, Ohio, in preparation for the upcoming Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)
Gene J. Puskar/AP

NPR Politics presents the Lunchbox List: our favorite campaign news and stories curated from NPR and around the Web in digestible bites (100 words or less!). Look for it every weekday afternoon from now until the conventions.

Convention Countdown

The Republican National Convention is in 3 days in Cleveland.

The Democratic National Convention is in 10 days in Philadelphia.

Did you know? Comcast, the "official broadband and telecommunications provider" for the DNC in Philadelphia, has announced it will be laying miles of new fiber in preparation for the convention. Once done, convention-goers will be able to upload selfies and retweet over internet speeds 17,000 times faster than the average home.


July 14, 2016

Today we talked about Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's apology for her "ill-advised" Trump comments, Hillary Clinton campaigning with possible VP pick Sen. Tim Kaine today, whether Donald Trump's business proneness could help mend the U.S. economy, how politics corresponds with religion, the "Never Trump" campaign's last-ditch effort to stop Trump's nomination, and how Sen. Jeff Sessions shares Donald Trump's hardline view on immigration.

Our Top Five

Our favorite 2016 stories this morning from NPR and around the Web.

  • 1. Black GOP Senator Says He's Been Stopped By Police 7 Times In A Year

    Jacquelyn Martin/AP
    South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott earlier this year.
    Jacquelyn Martin/AP

    NPR reports: The only black Republican Senator in Congress gave a personal speech on the Senate floor Wednesday. Following the deadly shootings in Missouri and Louisiana, Sen. Tim Scott said many law enforcement officers do good, but some do not. He claimed he'd experienced being pulled over by police for occasionally speeding and other times for "driving a new car in the wrong neighborhood or something else just as trivial." He asked his colleagues to imagine the loss of dignity that comes with each of these stops. "We must find a way to fill these cracks in the very foundation of our country," he said.

  • 2. ACLU, Other Local Groups To Sue Baton Rouge Police Department

    Courtesy of Akeem Muhammad
    Akeem Muhammad stands with a group of protesters in Baton Rouge, La., on Sunday. The 24-year-old student was one of more than 120 people who were arrested during the protest.
    Courtesy of Akeem Muhammad

    CBS News Reports: The American Civil Liberties Union of Louisiana has sued the Baton Rouge Police Department, and other law enforcement agencies, claiming the Louisiana agency violated the First Amendment rights of peaceful demonstrators. Several protests had been held in Baton Rouge following the police shooting and death of Alton Sterling. The ACLU, which filed the lawsuit in partnership with other local groups, says police used excessive force, wrongful arrest, and abuse to break up the protests, which ended in around 200 arrests.

  • 3. Restricted Interrogation Techniques Approved For Use On Prisoners

    John Moore/Getty Images
    A guard tower stands at the perimeter of Camp Delta in the Guantanamo Bay detention center on March 30, 2010. On Sunday, the Pentagon announced five Yemeni detainees had been transferred to the United Arab Emirates.
    John Moore/Getty Images

    BuzzFeed News reports: Despite President Obama's promise in 2009, Department of Defense documents obtained by BuzzFeed show "separation," an "enhanced interrogation technique" similar to solitary confinement, was often approved for use in combination with other already restricted interrogation techniques, raising alarms for humanitarian advocates. The heavily redacted documents, which were obtained through a FOIA request, describe interrogation tactics applied to dozens of prisoners at the American military base in Bagram, Afghanistan.

  • 4. Dollar Dollar Bills, Y'all

    Flickr user Frankieleon/Flickr Creative Commons
    Money.
    Flickr user Frankieleon/Flickr Creative Commons

    Member Station KUOW reports: Big money is flowing into Washington State ahead of the November election. And most of it is coming from out-of-state interests. An analysis by KUOW found $14 million contributions to date, with Hadi Partovi, code.org co-founder, giving $99,999 to the I-1464 campaign, which aims to eliminate big money in local elections. Partovi said, "The only way to fix the system is within the system we have." On both Democratic and Republican sides, more than $1,000,000,000 has been donated to campaigns this year.

  • 5. This Is A "YUUUUGE" Deal

    Scott Olson/Getty Images
    Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders campaigns in Los Angeles on June 7.
    Scott Olson/Getty Images

    The Associated Press reports: With the conclusion of his campaign just days ago, Thomas Dunne Books has revealed that it will be publishing a book penned by Bernie Sanders titled Our Revolution: A Future to Believe In. The book is said to include both policy ideas and reflections on his primary campaign run. In a statement to the Associated Press, the publisher says the idea for a book was first suggested to Sanders earlier this year, but was only considered recently as he was then too busy to consider the project. This won't be Sanders first foray onto shelves: he co-authored a previous book — Outsider in the White House — reprinted recently in 2015.

  • BONUS: Nobody's Tired Of Pokemon Go Yet?

    Ruby Wallau/NPR
    The mobile app Pokémon Go is currently the top downloaded free app in both Apple and Android stores.
    Ruby Wallau/NPR

    USA Today: The Clinton campaign in Ohio is vying to catch voters in the midst of playing Pokemon Go. The campaign has set up voter registration booths at Pokestops and Gyms, real world locations at which players of the wildly successful game must visit to obtain items and advance in the game. "Gotta Reg 'em all," tweeted Jennifer Friedmann, regional organizing director for the Clinton campaign, on a caption to a photo of volunteers at one such Pokestop.