Pokémon Go Is Everywhere, Even At Foggy Bottom State Department briefings can be long, so it wasn't surprising that a reporter seemed a little distracted the other day. Department spokesman John Kirby caught the reporter playing Pokémon Go.
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Pokémon Go Is Everywhere, Even At Foggy Bottom

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Pokémon Go Is Everywhere, Even At Foggy Bottom

Pokémon Go Is Everywhere, Even At Foggy Bottom

Pokémon Go Is Everywhere, Even At Foggy Bottom

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487303101/487312147" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

State Department briefings can be long, so it wasn't surprising that a reporter seemed a little distracted the other day. Department spokesman John Kirby caught the reporter playing Pokémon Go.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. You know, State Department briefings can be long - take Friday's. Reporters spent nearly an hour with State Department spokesman John Kirby, and at least one seemed a little distracted.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

JOHN KIRBY: You're playing the Pokemon thing right there, aren't you?

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: I was just keeping an eye on it.

GREENE: Just keeping an eye on it. Well, Kirby kept going, but his own Pokemon curiosity got the best of him.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

KIRBY: Did you get one?

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: No, the signal is not very good.

KIRBY: I'm sorry about that.

GREENE: Let us know if anyone catches that reporter. It's MORNING EDITION.

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