Forget Instagram. We've Been Showing Off Fancy Food For Centuries Scroll through social feeds long enough, and you're bound to come across someone gloating about their incredible meal. But exotic or aspirational foods have been used in Western art for 500 years.
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Forget Instagram. We've Been Showing Off Fancy Food For Centuries

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Forget Instagram. We've Been Showing Off Fancy Food For Centuries

Forget Instagram. We've Been Showing Off Fancy Food For Centuries

Forget Instagram. We've Been Showing Off Fancy Food For Centuries

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487577888/487577889" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scroll through social feeds long enough, and you're bound to come across someone gloating about their incredible meal. But exotic or aspirational foods have been used in Western art for 500 years.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Seems like you can't dine out anymore without seeing someone snap a photo of their beautiful meal and post it on social media. But this trend, #foodporn, is nothing new. Researchers at Cornell University analyzed hundreds of Western still life paintings from the last 500 years. And they found those paintings over represented aspirational foods - of the exotic foods glorified in paint, lobster and artichokes. It's MORNING EDITION.

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