LISTEN: At The DNC, We Asked Women Why They Were Voting For Clinton We asked women — as young as 4 and as old as 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision.

LISTEN: At The DNC, We Asked Women Why They Were Voting For Clinton

LaVon Bracy, 67, of Florida

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History was made at the Democratic National Convention this past week. Hillary Clinton, as the first female presidential candidate of a major U.S. party, is officially embarking an unprecedented American political campaign.

We asked women — as young as 4 and as old 77 — how much the weight of history factored into their decision. Listen:

LaVon Bracy, 67, of Florida

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LaVon Bracy says she can now honestly tell her granddaughters that they can be president of the United States. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Karla Stoebis, 33, of Wisconsin

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Karla Stoebis, who came to the convention as a Sanders supporter, now wishes her "strong Democratic grandmothers" were here to witness history. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Karla Stoebis, who came to the convention as a Sanders supporter, now wishes her "strong Democratic grandmothers" were here to witness history.

Andrew Harnik/AP

Carmen Guzman, 54, Virginia via Oaxaca, Mexico

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Carmen Guzman of McLean, Va., and originally from Oaxaca, Mexico on the final day of the Democratic National Convention. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Kathryn Hensley, 77, of South Carolina

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Katherine Hensley says a female presidential candidate has been "a dream." Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Meg Kelly/NPR

Deborah Langhoff, 69, of Louisiana

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Debroah Langhoff says that her mother was born at a time when women didn't have the right to vote and that she would be lying if she said history didn't play a role in her decision to back Clinton. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Loretta Talbott, 9, of Maryland

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Loretta Talbott says Clinton's nomination proves women are just as powerful as men. Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Diana Hatsis-Neuhoff, 54, of Florida

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Diana Hatsis-Neuhoff says her decision to now support Clinton had "nothing to do with what was between my legs." Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Dawn Smalls, 38, and her daughter Eva, 4, of New York

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Eva Smalls with her mother Dawn Smalls (not pictured) says she likes Clinton because "she's a girl." Meg Kelly/NPR hide caption

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Eva Smalls with her mother Dawn Smalls (not pictured) says she likes Clinton because "she's a girl."

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