An Alabama Museum You Can Enjoy From The Driver's Seat Artist Butch Anthony has created a drive-thru museum in Seale, Ala. On display is a collection of odd items, decorated and displayed inside shipping containers that vehicles drive between.
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An Alabama Museum You Can Enjoy From The Driver's Seat

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An Alabama Museum You Can Enjoy From The Driver's Seat

An Alabama Museum You Can Enjoy From The Driver's Seat

An Alabama Museum You Can Enjoy From The Driver's Seat

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/487384516/489284084" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Artist Butch Anthony created a drive-thru museum of odd items in Seale, Ala. Timothy Hursley /Courtesy of Butch Anthony hide caption

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Timothy Hursley /Courtesy of Butch Anthony

Artist Butch Anthony created a drive-thru museum of odd items in Seale, Ala.

Timothy Hursley /Courtesy of Butch Anthony

Here's one museum you can enjoy without even getting out of your car: a drive-thru museum in Seale, Ala.

Created by artist Butch Anthony, it's a collection of odd items — many of which people have given him — that he has decorated and set up inside shipping containers cut out with large display windows.

There's a gallstone from 1971 billed as the largest with a poem it inspired, a two-headed duck in a domed jar and an assortment of fossils.

"Then I've got it mixed with my artwork," he says. "I take old portraits from like the 1890s, but then I put bones on top of them, sort of like an X-ray, like you can see through them. That's the kind of art I do. I call it Intertwangleism. Sort of like cubism. That's my ism."

Anthony's art career got started when he was kid and found a dinosaur bone. "So I took it home and made a little display, a little pedestal, a little piece of velvet on it, stuck it in a old barn we have, people were coming all around looking at it," he says.

Near the exit of the museum there's a comment box which Anthony checks often.

"Checked it the other day and somebody wrote 'What kind of drugs are you taking?' And one said 'You have a warped mind, but I like it.' So I guess folks like it," he says.

Click on the audio to hear Anthony on a tour of his drive-thru museum.

Morning Edition is visiting unsung museums all across the county, those little-known but ridiculously interesting gems you're glad you stumbled across.