Why Canadian Swimmer Flips His Dad The Bird Swimmer Santo Condorelli and his father give each other the middle finger wave. Joseph Condorelli told the New York Daily News they started doing this routine when Santo was 8 to release tension

Why Canadian Swimmer Flips His Dad The Bird

Why Canadian Swimmer Flips His Dad The Bird

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Swimmer Santo Condorelli and his father give each other the middle finger wave. Joseph Condorelli told the New York Daily News they started doing this routine when Santo was 8 to release tension

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. You know, Olympic athletes have different routines to deal with all that pressure. Before a race, Canadian swimmer Santo Condorelli takes a moment to seek out his father in the stands. And when he finds him, he flips him off. Yep, middle finger. He does that in response to dad giving him the bird. Joseph Condorelli told The New York Daily News they started doing this when Santo was 8. It's a way for him to release the tension. Dad said his son's approach should be - give it to the world. It's MORNING EDITION.

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