Crossword Enthusiast's Sleuthing Leads To Flirty Twitter Fight With NYTimes Crossword When a frequent crossworder noticed a hidden message in the New York Times crossword puzzle, he began an epic Twitter quarrel that got romantic, and a little bit sexy.

Crossword Enthusiast's Sleuthing Leads To Flirty Twitter Fight With NYTimes Crossword

Crossword Enthusiast's Sleuthing Leads To Flirty Twitter Fight With NYTimes Crossword

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When a frequent crossworder noticed a hidden message in the New York Times crossword puzzle, he began an epic Twitter quarrel that got romantic, and a little bit sexy.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Now, Will Shortz and WEEKEND EDITION are in a long-term relationship, and it would take a lot for us to break up. But things do get dramatic in the world of crosswords. Last week, frequent New York Times crossworder (ph) Matt Negrin noted that the Times crossword, of which our own Will Shortz is the editor, seemed hooked on heartbreak. He noted three separate clues - dissolve a relationship, breaks up, and, quote, "no longer a couple."

He tweeted at The Times and got this well-worn reply - we need to talk. What followed was a lover's quarrel for the ages. Negrin asked, is there someone else? And The Times really played with his emotions, saying you said the fact that we weren't easy is what you liked about me. And listeners, then things got weird and maybe a little lewd. I'll let you read it for yourself. But don't worry. In the end, Matt Negrin and The New York Times found common ground - make that grid.

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