Modern Day Canoeists Travel From Greenland To Scotland Olly Hicks and George Bullard paddled across open ocean and a stretch called the Devil's Dance Floor. They made the trip in 66 days.
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Modern Day Canoeists Travel From Greenland To Scotland

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Modern Day Canoeists Travel From Greenland To Scotland

Modern Day Canoeists Travel From Greenland To Scotland

Modern Day Canoeists Travel From Greenland To Scotland

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Olly Hicks and George Bullard paddled across open ocean and a stretch called the Devil's Dance Floor. They made the trip in 66 days.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. There have long been tales of Inuits paddling more than a thousand miles from Greenland to Scotland. In the 1700s, one man thought to be an Inuit came ashore with his kayak, exhausted and dying. Olly Hicks and George Bullard just made that daunting journey in a canoe, paddling across open ocean and a stretch called the Devil's Dance Floor. After 66 days, they told the BBC they'd reawaken the myth of the Inuits. It's MORNING EDITION.

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