Radio Play-By-Play Announcer Describes Game Disruption Kevin Harlan of Westwood One was broadcasting during Monday Night Football when someone ran onto the field. Harlan described him as a "goofball in a hat" and more. Police eventually tacked the man.
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Radio Play-By-Play Announcer Describes Game Disruption

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Radio Play-By-Play Announcer Describes Game Disruption

Radio Play-By-Play Announcer Describes Game Disruption

Radio Play-By-Play Announcer Describes Game Disruption

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494043622/494043623" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Kevin Harlan of Westwood One was broadcasting during Monday Night Football when someone ran onto the field. Harlan described him as a "goofball in a hat" and more. Police eventually tacked the man.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Years ago, I worked as a radio sportscaster and admired those who did it well. Westwood One's Kevin Harlan did on Monday when a pro football game was disrupted.

(SOUNDBITE OF RADIO BROADCAST)

KEVIN HARLAN: Hey, somebody has run out on the field - some goofball in a hat and a red shirt. Now he takes off the shirt. He's running down the middle by the 50. He's at the 30. He's bare-chested and banging his chest. Now he runs the opposite way.

INSKEEP: TV didn't show the action, but Harlan gave the facts until police tackled the man. It's MORNING EDITION.

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