Prediction Our panelists predict who will be the next person to have their email hacked and what will we learn.
NPR logo

Prediction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494367757/494371958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Prediction

Prediction

Prediction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/494367757/494371958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Our panelists predict who will be the next person to have their email hacked and what will we learn.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, who will get their email hacked next? Adam Burke.

ADAM BURKE: They're going to hack the inbox of a penis enlargement company. And at this point, I'd like to state categorically I've never used the web address apoorexcuseforawilly@gmail.com (ph).

SAGAL: Roxanne Roberts.

BURKE: Dick Cheney is going to be hacked, and they'll find an email to Donald Rumsfeld that reads, and they thought we were bad - ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.

SAGAL: And Peter Grosz.

PETER GROSZ: A hack of Peter Sagal's email will reveal that he thinks Roxanne Roberts is an international pariah, he thinks Adam Burke has unbridled ambition and is not transformational, he claims Bill Kurtis is sleeping with bimbos and he thinks that I am his favorite panelist.

(LAUGHTER, APPLAUSE)

BILL KURTIS: Well, Peter, if any of that happens, we'll ask you about it on WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

SAGAL: Thank you, Bill Kurtis. Thanks also to Adam Burke, Roxanne Roberts, Peter Grosz. Thank to all of you for listening, every single last one of you. We appreciate it. I am Peter Sagal, and we will see you next week.

(APPLAUSE, SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SAGAL: This is NPR.

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.