What's Your Sign? Look Again, Says NASA If you rely on an insight from your daily horoscopes, you may have been looking at the wrong sign this whole time.
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What's Your Sign? Look Again, Says NASA

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What's Your Sign? Look Again, Says NASA

What's Your Sign? Look Again, Says NASA

What's Your Sign? Look Again, Says NASA

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495357951/495357952" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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If you rely on an insight from your daily horoscopes, you may have been looking at the wrong sign this whole time.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Earlier this year, NASA wrote a little blog post that noted a big change which has gotten some folks pretty stressed out. For those of you out there who pay attention to astrology, NASA has some knowledge to drop on your crystal ball. It seems that when the ancient Babylonians made the Zodiac over 3,000 years ago there were actually 13 constellations. But since they had a 12-month calendar, they ditched the last one to keep things organized.

NASA also pointed out that the Earth's axis no longer even points in the same direction as when those constellations were drawn. This means that the signs as we know them all have different date ranges. So all you fussy Virgos - some of you are actually generous Leos. So stop stressing about everything, you have no excuse.

But wait, you might be asking, what does NASA have to do with astrology? Nothing, says the agency. It released a statement saying, quote, "we didn't change any zodiac signs. We did the math. NASA studies astronomy, not astrology." In other words, no one at NASA cares if you just went from Scorpio to Sagittarius. Seriously, Mercury must be in retrograde.

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