Before 'Humans Of New York,' Terkel Showed Dignity In Everyday People In 'Working' Iconic journalist Studs Terkel was creating a best-seller, when he interviewed people around the U.S. for his book Working: People Talk About What They Do All Day and How They Feel About What They Do.
NPR logo

Before 'Humans Of New York,' Terkel Showed Dignity In Everyday People In 'Working'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495391521/495391522" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Before 'Humans Of New York,' Terkel Showed Dignity In Everyday People In 'Working'

Before 'Humans Of New York,' Terkel Showed Dignity In Everyday People In 'Working'

Before 'Humans Of New York,' Terkel Showed Dignity In Everyday People In 'Working'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495391521/495391522" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Decades ago, author, Studs Terkel traveled the country with a tape recorder, interviewing regular people about what they did for a living. The interviews became a book called, Working, and it struck a chord with readers because it revealed the dignity in the lives of every day people. Radio Diaries, along with Project& listened to those interviews, and all this week NPR presents the best of what they found.