Manhattan Gets A New Monument — To A (Fake) Octopus Attack The sculpture depicts that time a passenger ferry was dragged down by a giant octopus — which never happened. The artist says he conceived of the prank while telling fake history to an 11-year-old.

Manhattan Gets A New Monument — To A (Fake) Octopus Attack

Manhattan Gets A New Monument — To A (Fake) Octopus Attack

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The sculpture depicts that time a passenger ferry was dragged down by a giant octopus — which never happened. The artist says he conceived of the prank while telling fake history to an 11-year-old.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

New York joins Philadelphia as a city that makes up its own history. Ride a horse-drawn carriage in Philadelphia and the driver will give you bogus stories of the revolution. Now New York is the scene of a monument to a ferry disaster. The sculpture depicts the time a passenger ferry boat was dragged down by a giant octopus, which never happened. The artist says he first thought of this prank when telling fake history stories to an 11-year-old.

It's MORNING EDITION.

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