Watch Local Natives Play On A Dock Off The East River Watch the California band play "Fountain Of Youth" on an overcast summer evening in Brooklyn.

Field Recordings

Local Natives Strips Down Its Sound For A Riverside Show

The East River Ferry is one of the more whimsical ways for New Yorkers to commute, but it retains its claim to practicality with one key characteristic: It is a very fast boat. So it was that Local Natives came hurtling toward our crew up the river one overcast evening this summer, shouting three-part harmonies over roaring engines for a surprised clutch of fans. When the ferry docked, three of the band's members hurried over to our pier off WNYC Transmitter Park to play this Field Recording.

That boundless energy and will to connect with fans has characterized the band since its start. In 2010, Local Natives came clattering into the indie firmament with the U.S. release of Gorilla Manor, an irresistible blend of in-vogue sonic signifiers like Afropop guitars, rich harmonies and the hint of a folk sensibility. In 2016, the band's run has continued with the synth-heavy Sunlit Youth.

For their Field Recording, Local Natives played one of the singles off that album, "Fountain of Youth." Though the recorded version is lush and electronic, Local Natives stripped the song to a driving core. The band played, and then it was off again — guitars in hand, headed for the evening's show elsewhere in Brooklyn, then on to the next.

SET LIST:

  • "Fountain Of Youth"

CREDITS:

Producers: Nickolai Hammar, Benjamin Naddaff-Hafrey; Audio Engineer: Josh Rogosin; Director: Kevin Chiu; Editor: Nickolai Hammar; Colorist: Nicole Conflenti; Videographers: Kevin Chiu, Nickolai Hammar; Series Producer: Mito Habe-Evans; Executive Producer: Anya Grundmann; Special Thanks: Mark and Rachel Dibner of the Argus Fund

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