Divided Father And Son Weigh In On Election Day We check in with a father and son we met during this presidential campaign season. Jim Bolin is a Republican from South Dakota. His son, Chris Bolin, is a Democrat living in Massachusetts.

Divided Father And Son Weigh In On Election Day

Divided Father And Son Weigh In On Election Day

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We check in with a father and son we met during this presidential campaign season. Jim Bolin is a Republican from South Dakota. His son, Chris Bolin, is a Democrat living in Massachusetts.

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Today marks the end of a long election season, and we wanted to check back with two people who we met along the way.

JIM BOLIN: My name's Jim Bolin. I live in Canton, S.D. I early voted last week with some reservation for Donald Trump.

CHRIS BOLIN: My name is Chris Bolin. I live in Cambridge, Mass., and I plan to vote with few reservations for Hillary Clinton.

MCEVERS: We first met Jim and Chris Bolin in July during a father-son vacation of sorts. They were at the Republican National Convention together. Jim was a delegate. Here they are at the time.

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J. BOLIN: I am more pro-Trump than I was when I started.

C. BOLIN: That's literally the exact opposite of what I thought would happen.

MCEVERS: So we recently got them on the line.

J. BOLIN: So how are you doing, Christopher?

C. BOLIN: Hey, not too bad.

MCEVERS: To talk about what has happened since the convention.

J. BOLIN: My mood and the mood of many people in the state of South Dakota that I talk to is that they aren't necessarily overjoyed with the choices.

C. BOLIN: I think especially this last week leading up to Election Day has become pretty sour. I think a lot of my friends have hit the point where we can't even talk about politics or the election. It just seems so ugly.

J. BOLIN: This isn't - hasn't been the easiest election. You know, I know we disagree on some of these things, but we can disagree without being disagreeable, as my mom used to say, your grandma used to say.

MCEVERS: And we had to ask - how will they feel tomorrow morning?

J. BOLIN: I'm going to either be somewhat happy or somewhat sad. But I'm going to look at it very realistically. Whoever is elected president is going to face major, major problems. And there will be opposition, strong opposition, to whoever becomes president.

C. BOLIN: I think on Wednesday morning, I'll be relieved no matter what. This will ideally be over.

J. BOLIN: And I would agree with that, too. I'll be relieved as well.

C. BOLIN: Yeah. I would rather not live in limbo any longer.

MCEVERS: And there's one more thing Jim Bolin will be doing tomorrow.

J. BOLIN: As a legislative candidate here in South Dakota, Wednesday morning I'll be doing that very glamorous job of picking up all of my yard signs and my road signs. I'll be down there in the dirt, pulling up fence posts and putting them in the back of my van. So that's the glamour of politics in rural South Dakota.

C. BOLIN: I remember helping you with that.

MCEVERS: That was Chris Bolin and his dad Jim.

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