Slovakian Brothers Named Fastest Gravediggers In Central Europe The two winners beat out stiff competition at this week's International Exhibition of Funeral, Burial, and Cremation Services.
NPR logo

Slovakian Brothers Named Fastest Gravediggers In Central Europe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501819344/501819345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Slovakian Brothers Named Fastest Gravediggers In Central Europe

Slovakian Brothers Named Fastest Gravediggers In Central Europe

Slovakian Brothers Named Fastest Gravediggers In Central Europe

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/501819344/501819345" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The two winners beat out stiff competition at this week's International Exhibition of Funeral, Burial, and Cremation Services.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A couple of brothers from Slovakia are the fastest grave diggers in Central Europe. And they say it's a dream job. Ladislav and Csaba Skladan won the grave-digging championships at this week's International Exhibition of Funeral, Burial and Cremation Services.

Ten teams using only picks and shovels dug graves 5 feet deep, 6 and a half feet long and 3 feet wide. It turns out that Slovak graveyards can be crowded. So most graves are still dug by hand. The people who dig them have to work through rain and snow. The brothers won by digging a grave to spec in 54 minutes.

Ladislav Skladan told reporters, I had to focus on speed today. But, usually, if the weather is nice and I can chat with my brother, it's a dream job. The way they make grave digging sound, what kid would ever want to grow up to be a rock star?

Copyright © 2016 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.