Snarky Puppy: 'Music For The Brain And Booty' The instrumental band's deep, beyond-category grooves just earned a second Grammy Award. But as a live show in Dallas reveals, its sound is inseparable from church — and the state of Texas.

Jazz Night In America

Snarky Puppy: 'Music For The Brain And Booty'WBGO and Jazz At Lincoln Center

Snarky Puppy: 'Music For The Brain And Booty'

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The large instrumental band Snarky Puppy, which just won its second Grammy Award, is hard to pin down to one place. Its core is now in New York, but its members have toured and recorded all over the world, and their spiritual home is still Dallas, Texas. It's where they'd take in gospel performances in area churches; it's near where they initially met at music school at the University of North Texas in Denton. As bassist and bandleader Michael League explains, you can hear all those collisions in the pocket of their complex and beyond-category grooves. Snarky Puppy makes what it calls "music for the brain and booty" alike.

Jazz Night In America recently flew to Dallas to visit Mike League's old stomping grounds and take a deep dive into his fascinating compositional process. Then we witness its execution in a sold-out, live, hometown Snarky Puppy concert at The Door in Dallas.

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