New Zealand Brewer Recalls Exploding Beer Cans A New Zealand brewery had a new beer out in Sweden — until cans started exploding. Sweden stopped selling it. The brewer issued a voluntary recall and blames over-carbonation.
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New Zealand Brewer Recalls Exploding Beer Cans

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New Zealand Brewer Recalls Exploding Beer Cans

New Zealand Brewer Recalls Exploding Beer Cans

New Zealand Brewer Recalls Exploding Beer Cans

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A New Zealand brewery had a new beer out in Sweden — until cans started exploding. Sweden stopped selling it. The brewer issued a voluntary recall and blames over-carbonation.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. A New Zealand brewery has a new beer out in Sweden - well, had. It's called Aro Noir. It is a dark stout with an explosive finish and not the good kind. Sweden stopped selling it after reports of cans exploding, raining down what is described as a multi-roasted aroma with hints of pumpernickel bread, coffee, prunes, cocoa, tobacco and licorice. The brewer has issued a voluntary recall. Their explanation does not require a science degree. They are blaming over-carbonation. It's MORNING EDITION.

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