In Make-A-Wish Request, Leukemia Patient Asks To Blow Stuff Up Luckily for the 12-year-old boy from Australia, the federal police like to blow things up. His two-day extravaganza included a mock-hostage crisis, and he got to blast through doors and brick walls.
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In Make-A-Wish Request, Leukemia Patient Asks To Blow Stuff Up

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In Make-A-Wish Request, Leukemia Patient Asks To Blow Stuff Up

In Make-A-Wish Request, Leukemia Patient Asks To Blow Stuff Up

In Make-A-Wish Request, Leukemia Patient Asks To Blow Stuff Up

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/503954962/503954963" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Luckily for the 12-year-old boy from Australia, the federal police like to blow things up. His two-day extravaganza included a mock-hostage crisis, and he got to blast through doors and brick walls.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Declan McLean-Pauley had a request for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. The Australian is 12 and has leukemia. And here's the wish he made - he wanted to blow stuff up. The Australian Federal Police like to blow things up too, so they staged an event for him. His two-day extravaganza included a mock hostage crisis. He rode in an armored vehicle, and he was allowed to do what many of us would love to do. He used explosives to blast through doors and brick walls. It's MORNING EDITION.

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