Traffic Cop Buys The Excuse Of Speeding Wisconsin College Student The student was rushing to find a friend who could help him with his necktie before a big presentation. While running the license and registration, the officer showed him how to tie the perfect knot.
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Traffic Cop Buys The Excuse Of Speeding Wisconsin College Student

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Traffic Cop Buys The Excuse Of Speeding Wisconsin College Student

Traffic Cop Buys The Excuse Of Speeding Wisconsin College Student

Traffic Cop Buys The Excuse Of Speeding Wisconsin College Student

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506550297/506550298" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The student was rushing to find a friend who could help him with his necktie before a big presentation. While running the license and registration, the officer showed him how to tie the perfect knot.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin with a story about how to get out of a traffic ticket. A Wisconsin college student got pulled over by a police officer for speeding. He told the cop he was rushing to find a friend who could help him tie his necktie before a big presentation at school. Apparently, the officer took pity on him. While running his license and registration, he showed Trevor Keeney how to tie the perfect knot. He let Keeney off with a warning to slow down and always keep the knot snug.

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