Panel Round One Our panelists answer questions about the week's news...Madam Cure.
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Panel Round One

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Panel Round One

Panel Round One

Panel Round One

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Our panelists answer questions about the week's news...Madam Cure.

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

So we want to remind everyone that they can join us here most weeks at the Chase Bank Auditorium in downtown Chicago, Ill. If you'd like a ticket or more information, just go over to wbez.org. You can find a link at our website. That's waitwait.npr.org. Right now, panel, it is time for you to answer some questions about this week's news. Brian, according to new research, if you want the best chance of surviving your hospital stay, make sure your doctor is a what?

BRIAN BABYLON: Like - a robot?

SAGAL: No, not a robot.

(LAUGHTER)

BABYLON: Give me it.

SAGAL: Well, no, it's doctress, please.

BABYLON: Oh, a - oh, a female doctor for feminine bedside manners?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That's pretty much it, actually.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELL)

SAGAL: Your chances of survival...

BABYLON: That sounds like a lady product, though.

SAGAL: ...Improve with a female doctor.

(APPLAUSE)

BABYLON: Yeah.

SAGAL: We now know being treated by female doctors - or, as your father calls them when you take him to the hospital, nurses...

(LAUGHTER)

AMY DICKINSON: True.

SAGAL: ...Gives you a 4 percent lower chance of dying than seeing their male counterparts.

DICKINSON: Now...

BABYLON: Four? Just four?

ADAM FELBER: Four?

SAGAL: Just 4 percent, just four. OK.

DICKINSON: Is it possible that...

FELBER: That sounds like it's within the margin of error.

BABYLON: Yeah.

(LAUGHTER)

DICKINSON: I'm just wondering if it's possible that that is because women maybe listen?

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: That is exactly...

DICKINSON: More than they talk?

SAGAL: You jest, Amy, but that's part of it, that women listen more.

DICKINSON: Uh-huh, they...

SAGAL: To - so they're advising men - male doctors - if they want to increase the survival rates of their patients, they should listen more like women do, spend more time in follow-up and stop celebrating successful open-heart surgeries by chest-bumping the patient.

BABYLON: Oh, yeah.

DICKINSON: Yeah.

BABYLON: Because, you know, they have those - you can Yelp doctors now, you know that?

SAGAL: Yeah.

BABYLON: They have, like, you know, you could just see, what's this guy? Oh. I...

DICKINSON: Wow.

BABYLON: ...can go down rabbit holes of people just talking bad about doctors.

FELBER: Yeah.

DICKINSON: Wow.

BABYLON: So - but...

FELBER: Yeah. But the people that the doctor kills...

SAGAL: Yeah.

FELBER: ...They never get to write those Yelp reviews.

SAGAL: That's true.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: So - and really, in a weird way, to the doctor, the incentive is either to cure you completely or kill you.

DICKINSON: Or kill you.

FELBER: Yeah. That's why men...

DICKINSON: For your silence.

FELBER: ...That's why male doctors are killing more patients, because they're gaming the system.

SAGAL: Right.

(LAUGHTER)

FELBER: They're like, this guy's going to kill me on Yelp unless...

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Yes.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG "MAN SMART")

HARRY BELAFONTE: (Singing) That's right, the woman is smarter. That's right, the woman is smarter. That's right, the woman is smarter. That's right, that's right.

SAGAL: Coming up, 'tis the season for a holiday-themed Bluff The Listener game. Call 1-888-WAIT-WAIT to play. We'll be back in a minute with more of WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME from NPR.

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