Ring In The New Year With Listeners' Good Luck Rituals When midnight strikes on New Year's Eve, it's natural to see people cheer with a champagne toast. Others follow tradition to bring in a more prosperous and lucky new year.

Ring In The New Year With Listeners' Good Luck Rituals

Ring In The New Year With Listeners' Good Luck Rituals

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When midnight strikes on New Year's Eve, it's natural to see people cheer with a champagne toast. Others follow tradition to bring in a more prosperous and lucky new year.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Tomorrow is New Year's Eve, and people all around the country will raise a toast or kiss a special someone to ring in 2017. This week, we asked you to share your very special good luck traditions with us here at MORNING EDITION.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Deborah and Jim Purdon of Maplewood, N.J., wrote us how they eat sardines on New Year's Eve.

MARTIN: Delicious.

GREENE: And then, on New Year's Day, they have a meal of pork roasted in sauerkraut.

MARTIN: That sounds better to me. Here's ANNAKE GARCIA from Salt Lake City, Utah.

ANNAKE GARCIA: My family is from Texas and had the tradition of eating black-eyed peas every New Year's Day. And every bean you eat is supposed to be one dollar you make in the new year. So as a kid, I would look at this giant bowl of black-eyed peas and think, this is amazing; I'm going to have so much money. And now, as an adult, I look at it and I was like, oh, man, that's all?

(LAUGHTER)

GREENE: But black-eyed peas are not the only food meant to usher in fortune. It turns out there are foods you don't even have to eat, and they still bring you luck. We talked to Ahu Moser on Skype, and she told us about this tradition that she learned from her mother while she was growing up in Turkey.

AHU MOSER: She used to smash a pomegranate on our doorstep.

MARTIN: But if you're looking for something that requires a little less cleanup, Christine Rheaume of Idyllwild, Calif., told us about her family's new year's ritual.

CHRISTINE RHEAUME: The first person through the entrance of the house had to be a male. So right before midnight, either my father or one of my brothers would go outdoors in the freezing cold and wait until midnight and then come in, and we would all cheer. My mother was Portuguese, and I think it came from her side of the family.

GREENE: Go out in the freezing cold (laughter)? Doesn't sound...

MARTIN: Whatever brings you luck, man.

GREENE: Whatever brings you luck. Well, we are wishing all of you good luck and also a safe and happy New Year from us here at MORNING EDITION.

MARTIN: Indeed.

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