'Indianians' No More: 'Hoosier' Gets Official Status The government style book has officially designated people from Indiana what they've long called themselves: Hoosiers.

'Indianians' No More: 'Hoosier' Gets Official Status

'Indianians' No More: 'Hoosier' Gets Official Status

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The government style book has officially designated people from Indiana what they've long called themselves: Hoosiers.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin. We've got Floridians and Californians, Alabamians and Idahoans. But Indianians? Nah, they're Hoosiers. And now the feds have made it official, updating the government stylebook to say so. No one knows where the name Hoosier comes from, but tall tales abound, including one that says it's from the olden days after brutal fights among settlers when people would pick up the body part and then ask - whose ear? Hoosier - get it? It's MORNING EDITION.

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