If You Run Out Of Money At The Casino, Don't Do This Instead of getting more money from an ATM, Kenny Johnson of Charleston, W.Va. robbed a bank so he could use the money to keep gambling. He now faces up to 18 years in prison.
NPR logo

If You Run Out Of Money At The Casino, Don't Do This

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511942827/511942828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
If You Run Out Of Money At The Casino, Don't Do This

If You Run Out Of Money At The Casino, Don't Do This

If You Run Out Of Money At The Casino, Don't Do This

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/511942827/511942828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Instead of getting more money from an ATM, Kenny Johnson of Charleston, W.Va. robbed a bank so he could use the money to keep gambling. He now faces up to 18 years in prison.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Not in any way speaking from personal experience - but you know those moments at the casino when you're at the table, you know you should go home and instead you hit the ATM? Well, Kerry Johnson of Charleston, W.V., did not hit the ATM. He got up from the blackjack table, put a chip down to hold his spot, drove to a bank and robbed it. Took 5,000 bucks back to the casino, and he lost. As luck would have it, he is now facing up to 18 years in prison. It's MORNING EDITION.

Copyright © 2017 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.