You Never Know What You'll Find On The New York City Subway Riders were on the New York City subway when an abandoned bottle of wine rolled out from under a seat. Two complete strangers shared the bottle. Journalist Colleen Hagerty saw it and tweeted about it.
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You Never Know What You'll Find On The New York City Subway

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You Never Know What You'll Find On The New York City Subway

You Never Know What You'll Find On The New York City Subway

You Never Know What You'll Find On The New York City Subway

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/517882243/517882244" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Riders were on the New York City subway when an abandoned bottle of wine rolled out from under a seat. Two complete strangers shared the bottle. Journalist Colleen Hagerty saw it and tweeted about it.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with a perfect moment in New York City. Riders were on the subway when a bottle of wine rolled out from under a seat. Apparently, somebody had abandoned it. Passengers knew just what to do in this emergency. And because it's the media capital, you know, a journalist named Colleen Hagerty was on hand to document what they did. Two complete strangers opened the wine bottle and shared it. Hagerty's tweet of that incident is time-stamped 8 minutes after midnight. It's MORNING EDITION.

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