Texas Will Use New Poison To Cut Down On Feral Pig Population Wild pigs are a menace to farmers in Texas. The state has approved a new pesticide that kills feral pigs. The decision is controversial with environment groups.

Texas Will Use New Poison To Cut Down On Feral Pig Population

Texas Will Use New Poison To Cut Down On Feral Pig Population

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Wild pigs are a menace to farmers in Texas. The state has approved a new pesticide that kills feral pigs. The decision is controversial with environment groups.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Texas, farmers are having a wild pig problem. The feral hogs are destroying crops, costing the agriculture industry tens of millions of dollars every year.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

So now Sid Miller, the state's agriculture commissioner, says enough is enough. And he's going to unleash what he calls a hog apocalypse.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

SID MILLER: We've concluded our research, and we're now going to send all those little piggies to hog heaven.

GREENE: So Miller's hog apocalypse will come in the form of a new pesticide that kills feral pigs. It is called Kaput Feral Hog Lure.

INSKEEP: Texas has approved it for use. Jack Mayer is a biologist with the Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, S.C.

JACK MAYER: This is a modified rodenticide, basically, a modified rat poison.

GREENE: And it is controversial with environmental groups. They are worried that the pesticide is both inhumane and that it could affect more than just wild pigs.

MAYER: Other animals that may get ahold of this bait and eat enough to be impacted by it and potentially even killed.

INSKEEP: Which sounds bad, but biologist Jack Mayer says wild pig populations have exploded in Texas. There's an estimated 2 million feral hogs roaming the state, and officials have not found any other way of stopping them.

MAYER: We've tried trapping. We've tried shooting. We're doing aerial gunning. But it's not really knocking down the numbers so that we're seeing a significant decrease in the damage that these animals are causing.

GREENE: Kaput Feral Hog Lure will hit the market in Texas in May.

(SOUNDBITE OF SAXON SHORE'S "ANGELS AND BROTHERLY LOVE")

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