The Multigenerational Fight Against North Dakota Parking Meters In 1948, farmer Howard Henry led a movement to have parking meters banned in North Dakota. Now the governor wants to lift the ban, but Henry's granddaughter is still opposed to them.

The Multigenerational Fight Against North Dakota Parking Meters

The Multigenerational Fight Against North Dakota Parking Meters

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In 1948, farmer Howard Henry led a movement to have parking meters banned in North Dakota. Now the governor wants to lift the ban, but Henry's granddaughter is still opposed to them.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. One lesson of politics is that no fight is ever over. There's a multi-generational fight over parking meters in North Dakota. In 1948, Howard Henry got a parking ticket and struck back in the way you can in a democracy, spearheading a movement to have parking meters banned. Sixty-nine years later, Governor Doug Burgum wants to lift that ban. Businesses want drivers to move their cars, allowing others to park. But Mr. Henry's granddaughter is still opposed to the meters. It's MORNING EDITION.

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