Someone Made A Coconut Cannon (Really) After someone heard a bang in Berlin, police found a home-made cannon that shoots coconuts with compressed air. A man said he built it for an art project to be used in Antarctica and was testing it.
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Someone Made A Coconut Cannon (Really)

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Someone Made A Coconut Cannon (Really)

Someone Made A Coconut Cannon (Really)

Someone Made A Coconut Cannon (Really)

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After someone heard a bang in Berlin, police found a home-made cannon that shoots coconuts with compressed air. A man said he built it for an art project to be used in Antarctica and was testing it.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. A man walking his dog in Berlin was nearly whapped by a flying coconut, which smashed against a nearby lamppost. Police soon discovered a coconut cannon, which uses compressed air. Its creator planned to use it as part of an art project in Antarctica.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Obviously.

INSKEEP: Yeah. He said he was just testing it.

MARTIN: As one does.

INSKEEP: Of course you try out your coconut canon before shipping it to the South Pole. But for some reason, police confiscated it. It's MORNING EDITION.

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